Page 8 of 9: record(s) 176 to 200 of 201

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HERBS & SPICES - Lembas Bulk

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant evergreen needle-like leaves. It is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, which also includes many other herbs. The name rosemary has nothing to do with the rose or the name Mary, but derives from the Latin name rosmarinus, which is from "dew" (ros) and "sea" (marinus), or "dew of the sea"-apparently because it is frequently found growing near the sea. Rosemary has a very old reputation for improving memory, and has been used as a symbol for remembrance (during weddings, war commemorations and funerals) in Europe and Australia. Mourners would throw it into graves as a symbol of remembrance for the dead. In Shakespeare's Hamlet, Ophelia says, "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." (Hamlet, iv. 5.) One modern study lends some credence to this reputation. When the smell of rosemary was pumped into cubicles where people were working, those people showed improved memory, though with slower recall. The results of a study suggest that carnosic acid, found in rosemary, may shield the brain from free radicals, lowering the risk of strokes and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's. Rosemary contains a number of potentially biologically active compounds, including antioxidants such as carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid. Other bioactive compounds include caffeic acid, ursolic acid, betulinic acid, rosmaridiphenol, and rosmanol.

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Rosemary 0.5kg Rosemary 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
18190
4.84
0.00
Rosemary 1kg Rosemary 1kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01692
4.11
0.00
Rosemary 0.5kg Rosemary 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01693
2.52
0.00

Salvia officinalis (Sage, Common sage, Garden sage, Kitchen sage, Culinary sage, Dalmatian sage, Purple sage, Broadleaf sage, Red sage) is a small perennial evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers. It is a member of the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Mediterranean region and commonly grown as a kitchen and medicinal herb or as an ornamental garden plant. The word sage or derived names are also used for a number of related and non related species. As an herb, sage has a slight peppery flavour. In Western cooking, it is used for flavouring fatty foods (especially as a marinade), cheeses (Sage Derby), and some drinks. In the United States, Britain and Flanders, sage is used with onion for stuffing and also in sauces, and sage forms the dominant flavouring in the English Lincolnshire sausage. Sage is also common in Italian cooking. Sage is sauteed in olive oil and butter until crisp, then plain or stuffed pasta is added (burro e salvia). The Latin name for sage, salvia, means "to heal". Although the effectiveness of Common Sage is open to debate, it has been recommended at one time or another for virtually every ailment. Modern evidence supports its effects as an anhidrotic, antibiotic, antifungal, astringent, antispasmodic, estrogenic, hypoglycemic, and tonic. In a double blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trial, sage was found to be effective in the management of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. The strongest active constituents of Sage are within its essential oil, which contains cineole, borneol, and thujone. Sage leaf contains tannic acid, oleic acid, ursonic acid, ursolic acid, cornsole, cornsolic acid, fumaric acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, niacin, nicotinamide, flavones, flavonoid glycosides, and estrogenic substances. Caution is indicated when used in conjunction with central nervous system stimulants or depressants. Sage is used as a nootropic for its acetylcholinesterase inhibitor properties.

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Sage 0.5kg Sage 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
18191
7.30
0.00
Sage 10kg Sage 10kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
05034
72.52
0.00
Sage 1kg Sage 1kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01697
9.90
0.00
Sage 0.5kg Sage 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01698
4.11
0.00

The Slippery Elm Ulmus rubra is a species of elm native to eastern North America (from southeast North Dakota, east to southern Quebec, south to northernmost Florida, and west to eastern Texas). It is similar to American Elm in general appearance, but more closely related to the European Wych Elm, which has a very similar flower structure. Other common names include Red Elm, Gray Elm, Soft Elm, Moose Elm and Indian Elm. Slippery Elm is a valuable tree that has many traditional uses. The bark contains a mucilage that is used as a remedy for sore throats. Sometimes it is dried and ground into a powder beforehand, then made into a tea. Both Slippery Elm gruel and tea are said to soothe the digestive tract, especially the GI tracts of those with irritable bowel syndrome or gastritis. According to Herbs and Natural Supplements: An Evidence-Based Guide, "Although Slippery Elm has not been scientifically investigated, the FDA has approved it as a safe demulcent substance." The fibrous inner bark is a strong and durable fibre, which can be spun into thread, twine or rope. It can be used for bow strings, ropes, jewellery, clothing, snowshoe bindings, woven mats, and even some musical instruments. The wood is used for the hubs of wagon wheels, as it is very shock resistant owing to the interlocking grain. Once cured, the wood is also excellent for making fires with the bow drill method, as it grinds into a very fine flammable powder under friction.

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Slippery Elm Powder 0.5kg Slippery Elm Powder 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
03270
25.86v
5.17

Mentha spicata (Spear Mint or Spearmint) is a species of mint native to much of Europe and southwest Asia, though its exact natural range is uncertain due to extensive early cultivation. It grows in wet soils. It is an invasive species in the Great Lakes region where it was first sighted in 1843. It is a herbaceous rhizomatous perennial plant growing 30-100cm tall, with variably hairless to hairy stems and foliage, and a wide-spreading fleshy underground rhizome. The leaves are 5-9cm long and 1.5-3cm broad, with a serrated margin. Spearmint produces flowers in slender spikes, each flower pink or white, 2.5-3mm long and broad. Spearmint is grown for its aromatic and carminative oil, referred to as oil of spearmint. It grows well in nearly all temperate climates. Gardeners often grow it in pots or planters due to its invasive spreading roots. The plant prefers partial shade, but can flourish in full sun to mostly shade. Spearmint is best suited to loamy soils with plenty of organic material. Spearmint leaves can be used whole, chopped, dried and ground, frozen, preserved in salt, sugar, sugar syrup, alcohol, oil, or dried. The leaves lose their aromatic appeal after the plant flowers. Dry it by cutting just before, or right (at peak) as the flowers open, about 1/2-3/4 the way down the stalk (leaving smaller shoots room to grow). There is some dispute as to what drying method works best; some prefer different materials (such as plastic or cloth) and different lighting conditions (such as darkness or sunlight). Spearmint is an ingredient in several mixed drinks, such as the mojito and mint julep. It is used as a flavouring for toothpaste and confectionery, and is sometimes added to shampoos and soaps. In herbalism, spearmint is steeped as tea for the treatment of stomach ache.

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Spearmint 0.5kg Spearmint 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
18182
3.96
0.00
Spearmint 0.5kg Spearmint 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01655
2.83
0.00

Suma is the UK's largest independent wholefood wholesaler-distributor. Specialising in vegetarian, fairly traded, organic, ethical and natural products, we also have our own successful brand of food and non-food products.

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Suma Ground Black Pepper 6x25g Suma Ground Black Pepper 6x25g vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
46997
6.39
0.00
Suma Ground Turmeric 6x25g Suma Ground Turmeric 6x25g vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
47023
6.09
0.00

The Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) (from the Arabic: tamar hindi = Indian date) is a tree in the family Fabaceae. The genus Tamarindus is monotypic (having only a single species). The fruit pulp is edible and popular. The hard green pulp of a young fruit is very sour and acidic, so much it cannot be consumed directly, but is often used as a component of savory dishes. The ripened fruit is edible, as it becomes less sour and somewhat sweeter, but still very acidic. It is used in desserts as a jam, blended into juices or sweetened drinks, or as a snack. It is also consumed as a natural laxative. In Thailand, there is a carefully cultivated sweet variety with little or no tartness grown specifically to be eaten as a fresh fruit. It is also sometimes eaten preserved in sugar with chili as a sweet. It is used in both Asian and Latin American cuisines and is also an important ingredient in Imli Chutney, a spicy North Indian condiment; Pulusu, a sauce from Andhra Pradesh, India; Worcestershire sauce; HP sauce; and the Jamaican-produced Pickapeppa sauce. The pulp, leaves, and bark also have medical applications. For example, in the Philippines, the leaves have been traditionally used in herbal tea for reducing malaria fever. Tamarind is used as an Ayurvedic Medicine for gastric and/or digestion problems,cardioprotective activity. In Malaysia, Tamarind (Asam Jawa in Malay) is used to decrease body temperature by applying it as wet compress on forehead and if you drink, it can lessen your sore throat.

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Wet Tamarind 200g Wet Tamarind 200g vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
21394
2.25
0.00

Tarragon or dragon's-wort (Artemisia dracunculus L.) is a perennial herb in the family Asteraceae related to wormwood. Corresponding to its species name, a common term for the plant is "dragon herb." It is native to a wide area of the Northern Hemisphere from easternmost Europe across central and eastern Asia to India, western North America, and south to northern Mexico. The North American populations may however be naturalised from early human introduction. Tarragon is one of the four fines herbes of French cooking. Tarragon is one of the main components of Bearnaise sauce. Fresh, lightly bruised sprigs of tarragon may be steeped in vinegar to impart their flavour. Tarragon is used to flavour a popular carbonated soft drink in the countries of Armenia, Georgia and, by extension, Russia and Ukraine. The drink named Tarkhun (pronounced tarxun) - which is the Armenian, Persian and Russian word for tarragon - is made out of sugary tarragon concentrate and coloured bright green. In Slovenia, tarragon is used as a spice for sweet pastry called potica. Cis-Pellitorin, an isobutylamide eliciting a pungent taste, has been isolated from Tarragon plant.

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Tarragon Leaf 0.5kg Tarragon Leaf 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01702
9.99
0.00

Thyme is a well known herb; in common usage the name may refer to any or all members of the plant genus Thymus, or common thyme, Thymus vulgaris, and some other species that are used as culinary herbs or for medicinal purposes. Thyme is a good source of iron and is used widely in cooking. Thyme is a basic ingredient in French, Greek, Italian,Albanian, Lebanese, Persian, Portuguese, Libyan, Spanish, Syrian, and Turkish cuisines, and in those derived from them. It is also widely used in Arab and Caribbean cuisines. Thyme is often used to flavour soups and stews. It has a particular affinity to and is often used as a primary flavour with tomatoes and eggs. Thyme, while flavourful, does not overpower and blends well with other herbs and spices. In French cuisine, along with bay and parsley it is a common component of the bouquet garni, and of herbes de Provence. In some Levantine countries, the condiment za'atar (Arabic for thyme) contains thyme as a vital ingredient. The essential oil of common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is made up of 20-54% thymol.Thymol, an antiseptic, is the main active ingredient in Listerine mouthwash. Before the advent of modern antibiotics, it was used to medicate bandages. It has also been shown to be effective against the fungus that commonly infects toenails. A tea made by infusing the herb in water can be used for cough and bronchitis. Medicinally thyme is used for respiratory infections in the form of a tincture, tisane, salve, syrup or by steam inhalation. Because it is antiseptic, thyme boiled in water and cooled is very effective against inflammation of the throat when gargled 3 times a day. The inflammation will normally disappear in 2-5 days. Other infections and wounds can be dripped with thyme that has been boiled in water and cooled.

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Thyme 0.5kg Thyme 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
18192
4.46
0.00
Thyme 1kg Thyme 1kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01703
7.30
0.00
Thyme 0.5kg Thyme 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01704
3.49
0.00

In non-South Asian recipes, turmeric is sometimes used as an agent to impart a rich, custard-like yellow colour. It has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurt, yellow cakes, orange juice, biscuits, popcorn colour, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, etc. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is used in savoury dishes. Although usually used in its dried, powdered form, Turmeric is also used fresh - much like ginger. It has numerous uses in far east recipes, such as fresh turmeric pickle (which contains large chunks of soft turmeric). Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used to protect food products from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water containing products. Over-colouring, such as in pickles, relishes and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric is thought to have many medicinal properties and many in South Asia use it as a readily available antiseptic for cuts, burns and bruises. It is also used as an antibacterial agent.

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Turmeric 25kg Turmeric 25kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
74198
116.25
0.00
Turmeric 0.5kg Turmeric 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
18193
3.25
0.00
Turmeric 25kg Turmeric 25kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
05009
67.50
0.00
Turmeric 1kg Turmeric 1kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01705
3.46
0.00
Turmeric 0.5kg Turmeric 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
01706
2.24
0.00

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis, Valerianaceae) is a hardy perennial flowering plant, native to Europe and parts of Asia, with heads of sweetly scented pink or white flowers. It is consumed as food by the larvae of some Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) species including Grey Pug. The flowers are in bloom in the northern hemisphere from June to September. Valerian was used as a perfume in the sixteenth century. Valerian also contains isovaltrate, which has been shown to be an agonist for adenosine A1 receptor sites. This action may contribute to the herb's sedative effects. Valerian has uses in herbal medicine as a sedative. The main current use of valerian is as a remedy for insomnia, with a recent meta-analysis providing some evidence of effectiveness. It has been recommended for epilepsy but that is not supported by research (although valproic acid, an analogue of one of Valerian's constituents (valeric acid), is used as an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilising drug). Valerian root generally does not lose effectiveness over time.

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Cut Valerian 0.5kg Cut Valerian 0.5kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
03272
7.27v
1.45

Vanilla is a flavouring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla native to Mexico. Etymologically, vanilla derives from the Spanish word "vainilla", little pod. Originally cultivated by Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican peoples, Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes is credited with introducing both the spice and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s. Attempts to cultivate the vanilla plant outside Mexico and Central America proved futile because of the symbiotic relationship between the tlilxochitl vine that produced the vanilla orchid and the local species of Melipona bee; it wasn't until 1837 that Belgian botanist Charles Francois Antoine Morren discovered this fact and pioneered a method of artificially pollinating the plant. Unfortunately, the method proved financially unworkable and was not deployed commercially. In 1841, a 12-year-old French-owned slave by the name of Edmond Albius, who lived on Ile Bourbon, discovered the plant could be hand pollinated, allowing global cultivation of the plant. There are three main commercial preparations of natural vanilla: whole pod, powder (ground pods, kept pure or blended with sugar, starch or other ingredients), and extract (in alcoholic or occasionally glycerol solution) Vanilla flavouring in food may be achieved by adding vanilla extract or by cooking vanilla pods in the liquid preparation. A stronger aroma may be attained if the pods are split in two, exposing more of the pod's surface area to the liquid. In this case, the pods' seeds are mixed into the preparation. Natural vanilla gives a brown or yellow colour-preparations, depending on the concentration. Good quality vanilla has a strong aromatic flavour, but food with small amounts of low quality vanilla or artificial vanilla-like flavourings are far more common, since true vanilla is much more expensive. A major use of vanilla is in flavouring ice cream. The most common flavour of ice cream is vanilla, and thus most people consider it to be the "default" flavour. By analogy, the term "vanilla" is sometimes used as a synonym for "plain". Although vanilla is a prized flavouring agent on its own, it is also used to enhance the flavour of other substances, to which its own flavour is often complementary, such as chocolate, custard, caramel, coffee etc. in old medicinal literature, vanilla is described as an aphrodisiac and a remedy for fevers. These purported uses have never been scientifically proven, but it has been shown that vanilla does increase levels of catecholamines (including epinephrine, more commonly known as adrenaline), and as such can also be considered mildly addictive. In an in-vitro test vanilla was able to block quorum sensing in bacteria. This is medically interesting because in many bacteria quorum sensing signals function as a switch for virulence. The microbes only become virulent when the signals indicate that they have the numbers to resist the host immune system response.

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Vanilla Pods dozen Vanilla Pods dozen vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
48379
46.25
0.00
Vanilla Pods 1kg Vanilla Pods 1kg vgfftogs xN.B. this item cannot be split!
06075
766.67
0.00

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